The Issue With “A National Divorce”

Ephrom Josine
4 min readSep 28, 2023

For the past couple of years, a concept of a “national divorce,” or a form of secession in which the United States as we know it is split into multiple nations, has come back into the public discourse. Back in March, a poll found that around sixty six million Americans supported the idea after it was mentioned by Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene. After Barack Obama won re-election in 2012, petitions started appearing in all fifty states from critics of the President to get their state to leave the nation. This is not to say that calls for secession have been exclusively right-wing,
Louis J. Marinelli used the progressive nature of California to drum up support for his “Yes, California” movement after the 2016 Presidential Election resulted in Donald Trump’s victory, for example. After the 2004 Presidential Election, a popular meme proposed that all of the Kerry voting states become part of the “United States of Canada” while those who voted for Bush would be part of the nation of “Jesusland.”

However, although those in support of secession pretend it is some magical solution to the issues of the United States — Tom Woods even has a new book out called National Divorce: The Peaceful Solution to Irreconcilable Differences — but reality shows this to be much more complicated than many realize.

The biggest issue with this notion is that no state is made up of entirely Democrats or entirely Republicans. The famously Republican state of Texas has the city of Dallas, and the famously Democratic state of California has Orange County. Forcing these areas to leave the United States because of political disagreements they do not have goes against the entire point of a “national divorce” in that it forces a group of people to share a nation with people they have massive political differences than. This was even an issue the Confederacy had during the Civil War, with half of Virginia not agreeing with the state leaving the Union — hence why the solution was to split the state into Virginia and West Virginia, with West Virginia joining the Union in 1863.

However, the begs the question of how far such a thing would be allowed to go. For example, just as no state is made up of all Republicans or all Democrats, no single area is made up of people with the same political ideology. Would a Democrat who lives in Orange County — which, in this hypothetical, has decided to stay with the United States over leaving and being apart of the Republic of California — be…

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Ephrom Josine

Political Commentator; Follow My Twitter: @EphromJosine1