Reading Irreversible Damage Is An Awful Experience

Ephrom Josine
24 min readOct 26, 2021

Irreversible Damage: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters is the worst allegedly non-fiction book I have ever read. Published in 2020 and written by the famous anti-transgender author and journalist Abigail Shrier, the book has become very popular in anti-transgender circles. Last year, a group of transphobes attempted to put an advertisement for the book on a billboard. The book has also become a best seller multiple times since its release over a year ago. Both The Times in London and The Economist also declared it the best and most important book of 2020.

I want it to be known that, although I am an ally of the transgender rights movement, I tried to not let my opinion on the issue the book is about be the reason for my opinion on this book. Considering this is the biggest transphobic book at the moment, I would honestly have loved it to be filled with reasonable points that I could respectfully respond to from a person with honest concerns.

Of course, going in I expected it to be nothing more than a manifesto of bigotry, but even calling the book that is not entirely accurate. Honestly, if this book had been more bigoted, it ironically might have been a better read. I have read the deranged screeds of the racist, the sexist, the homophobic, the transphobic, and just about every other bigotry known to man — and I have occasionally enjoyed myself because of how insane these people can be. Reading Irreversible Damage is not like reading the bizarre racial opinions William Luther Pierce expressed in his novels — most famously The Turner Diaries — or the insane anti-Muslim opinions Frank Miller told us in Holy Terror, it’s like reading any other shitty non-fiction book by any other writer who doesn’t know how to write.

To put this another way: I planned to compare this book to On The Protocols Of The Learned Elders Of Zion — that would be insulting to On The Protocols Of The Learned Elders Of Zion.

Shrier does not have the skills needed to write a long book on a single topic — there’s nothing wrong with that, it’s just not something she’s meant to do. Her articles are commonly short, making their point quickly before moving on. Although I’ve never agreed with anything I’ve read from her, I have to concede that this is where she is most effective. I’ve

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Ephrom Josine

Political Commentator; Follow My Twitter: @EphromJosine1