Are Young People Today Too Well Behaved?

Ephrom Josine
5 min readNov 16, 2022

This article is dedicated to Alex Mitchell, who wrote an 11/9/2022 article for The New York Post with the headline “Gen Z party poopers have ruined after-work drinks.” To be fair, despite the rather douchey headline, the article itself is actually fairly interesting. Specifically, it notes that many in Generation Z would rather hang out with people outside of their job, while previous generations were much more fine with being friends with co-workers. With that said, I’m not sure how refusing to engage in a habit “ruins” it for anybody else — if you want to get drunk with your co-workers after work that’s fine, this is America, a growing number of people would just prefer not to join you.

I should also note that this article has a very strange definition of “Generation Z.” The term is used in reference to the generation after Millennials, who got that nickname because they either became adults or were born around the turn of the millennia. Usually this meant somebody who was born between 1982 and 2000, but since then the term Generation Z has come to mean somebody born after around the mid-1990’s. However, this article contains an even looser definition, citing somebody who is thirty-eight — meaning they were born around (literally) 1984 — for their examples.

In truth, I imagine the main reason being Generation Z not drinking as much as previous generations is because — well, they aren’t old enough to do so legally. Again, Generation Z used to mean the generation born after 2000, meaning the oldest among them turned twenty one last year. Obviously, I understand that people drink before they reach the legal age all the time, but people don’t go to bars and drink with co-workers before the legal age — if only because bars are legally required not to serve them.

I’ve pointed this out before, but a common theme among many of the articles about how bad the new generation is that they confuse “not wanting to engage in something” with “being against it.” We’ll ignore how silly it is to use the term “party pooper” in the headline of an official news article — call me a “party pooper” if you want, but I tend to think that slang in news headlines makes you look dumb, I can’t tell if you’re seven or eight-five— and instead point out that, as mentioned earlier, nobody is trying to stop those who want to drink with…

--

--

Ephrom Josine

Political Commentator; Follow My Twitter: @EphromJosine1